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Our Favorite Fall Coffees From Dallas Roasters

As the temperatures chill and many of us work from home, starting the day with a hot cup of coffee suddenly sounds even more attractive than usual, when it’s simply necessary.

If you’re into pumpkin and super-duper-fall flavors, check out this list.

This writer’s a black coffee drinker and a true appreciator of the talent in Dallas producing some fantastic roasts, ones that should never have their integrity harmed by the likes of sweeteners or cream-anything.

But this post’s not about a coffee drinker’s turned-up nose at people’s coffee-drinking habits. It’s about our local coffee roasters and what they’re up to these days. Here are some roasts we’re particularly excited about.

Addison Coffee Roasters

15012 Beltway Drive, Addison

Addison Coffee has seemingly countless flavors at any time of year. If you really want to go crazy, try the flavored coffees such as chocolate-candy cane, chocolate-hazelnut or cinnamon egg nog. But what actually sounds nice is the chicory blend. The website says “Enjoy the taste of New Orleans on this one,” but for this writer, the aroma is reminiscent of a little window in Marfa serving freshly fried doughnuts and chicory coffee. It’s a lovely smell, with or without the sweet pastry. Addison’s take is a blend of Latin American beans and a Vienna roast for a smoky flavor, they then add the roasted, ground chicory for a deep, rich, peppery blend.

Addison Coffee is available widely, including grocery stores. Get the Chicory Blend for $12.45 (16-ounce bag) online or at the storefront. Because the chicory is ground, this blend is only available for purchase that way.

Cultivar Coffee Bar and Roaster

313 W. Jefferson Blvd. (North Oak Cliff) and 1155 Peavy Road (East Dallas)

Cultivar continues to produce smooth, easy-drinking roasts we love, and they’re keeping things going for fall, too. The Happy Harvest Fall Blend uses two Ethiopian coffees — one is a washed process and the other is a natural. “So basically on one side, it brings in a lot of that floral and citrus notes you would get from a washed [process], and the natural process brings a nice sort of fruitiness, berry-ness thing going on,” says owner Jonathan Meadows. “Just fixed together, it really represents all of the great flavors that Ethiopian [coffees] have to offer.” Meadows says this one goes particularly well with dessert — something we will absolutely fact check by getting a jam-topped ricotta toast from Cultivar, just to be sure.

The Happy Harvest Fall Blend is available for $23 online and at both locations.

Full City Rooster Coffee Roasting Studio

1810 S. Akard St., No. 100 (Cedars)

This is one of those places we miss hanging out in pre-pandemic. Luckily, they’re still roasting, and there’s one item that leans a bit away from the traditional roast and has our eye. The Cascara is coffee-cherry tea that sounds like just what we need these days. As the website says, this “one of those unusual products that most people may not be familiar with.” Essentially, it’s the coffee cherry husk with just a bit of the dried fruit clinging to it. Expect this Cascara from India to have notes of raspberry, honey, black tea, orange blossom and cherry.

The Cascara is available for $10 (4-ounce bag) online to have it delivered, or pick it up at the storefront.

Coffee bean options line the window of Noble Coyote.EXPAND

Coffee bean options line the window of Noble Coyote.

Taylor Adams

Noble Coyote Coffee Roasters

819 Exposition Ave. (South Dallas)

This coffee roaster out of Exposition Park has a new Harvest Autumn Seasonal Blend right now. Notes of dark chocolate, almond butter, pine, candy apple, honey graham cracker and hazelnut will subtly take over your palate as you drink this one.

“This is the time of year when lots of fresh coffees arrive in the U.S. from their various origins. It’s a cathartic time, when our labors come to fruition. It’s time to wipe away the sweat, breathe deep, and enjoy life. Thus, we made our Harvest blend saturated with juicy red fruit notes, brown sugar sweetness, and a decadent body. Whether it’s your first cup of the day or your fourth, consider it a treat for a job well done,” the roaster’s website reads.

The Harvest Seasonal Blend is available for $17 (12-ounce bag) online to pick up at the store. Noble Coyote roasts blends regularly: If you see it listed as “Out of stock,” just check back another day, or have your beans roasted to order. Noble Coyote beans are also available in grocery stores.

Use your time at home to brew a local coffee.EXPAND

Use your time at home to brew a local coffee.

Taylor Adams

Oak Cliff Coffee Roasters

Davis Street Espresso, 819 W. Davis St. (North Oak Cliff)

The trailblazers for local coffee roasting have an Autumn Blend that sounds lovely for the season. Oak Cliff Coffee owner Shannon Neffendorf says one of their roasters, Dylan, said a few coffees paired well together and he wanted to create a blend for customers. Out of that came the Autumn Blend with beans from Honduras and El Salvador. “The notes we have are a tinge of orange, maple, clove — it’s really balanced and sweet, one of those coffees you want to drink all day,” Neffendorf says.

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The Autumn Blend is available for $18 (12-ounce bag) online, at Davis Street and in grocery stores.

White Rock Coffee

10105 E. Northwest Highway (Northeast Dallas) and 4216 Abrams Road (Hillside)

White Rock has a special blend just for that holiday in between Halloween and Christmas some people like to pass over. Their 2020 Thanksgiving Roast has notes of chocolate with a nutty sweetness and a smooth body. This one is designed to pair well with dessert.

The Thanksgiving Roast is available for $13.95 (12-ounce bag) online, in grocery stores and at White Rock locations.

There are more places to get coffee and more flavors to go wild; these are just a few to try — and share. These days, while we’re seeing fewer of our friends and loved ones to prevent further spread of the coronavirus, a gift in the form of a bag of local coffee is an ideal thing to leave on someone’s doorstep. And even better: while you’re sharing that gift, you’re supporting one of our small businesses.

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